Mosaic trisomy 8

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What is the life expectancy of someone with mosaic trisomy 8?

Due to the variability in symptoms that is seen for people with mosaic trisomy 8 It is hard to predict the exact life expectancy. Most often infants with many cells that have the extra chromosome 8 are very sick and many die in early childhood. However, individuals with less cells that have the extra chromosome 8 may have less health issues and often live longer. Rarely, individuals with a very small amount of extra chromosome 8 cells found on prenatal testing may have very few to no medical issues.

When mosaic trisomy 8 is found before a baby is born, through amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling, it can be very difficult to predict what health problems will occur. If the test finding mosaic trisomy 8 is a chorionic villus sampling, then there is a chance that all the trisomy 8 cells are only in the placenta and not in the baby (confined placenta mosaicism). The risk for confined placental mosaicism is approximately 1%. In this case, an amniocentesis may be suggested to look at the baby's cells directly. Medical geneticists and genetic counselors can be very helpful in discussing the possible outcomes based on this information.

References
  • https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/gard/5359/mosaic-trisomy-8/resources/1
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Can it be predicted if a person with mosaic trisomy 8 will have learning difficulties?

How do some cells get an extra 8 and others do not in mosaic trisomy 8?

Can someone with mosaic trisomy 8 have a successful pregnancy?

Why might people with mosaic trisomy 8 have multiple miscarriages?

Will a child with mosaic trisomy 8 be able to go to school?

Does agenesis of the corpus callosum cause any problems, such as learning disabilities in mosaic trisomy 8?

What is the average IQ of people with mosaic trisomy 8?

If I have a child with mosaic trisomy 8, what are the chances that my next child will have it?

Can it be predicted if a person with mosaic trisomy 8 will have learning difficulties?

It is not certain how many people with mosaic trisomy 8 have learning difficulties. However, it appears in the medical literature that more people will have learning disabilities than will not. There is a wide range of intellectual disabilities in people with mosaic trisomy 8. In some people learning disabilities are not present while in other people learning disabilities are severe.

References
  • https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/gard/5359/mosaic-trisomy-8/resources/9
How do some cells get an extra 8 and others do not in mosaic trisomy 8?

If both parents have normal chromosomes with no rearrangements or extra chromsomes, then the chances are low that another child will have the same disorder. Usually, mosaic trisomy 8 is caused by a chromosomal change that is new to the child. This means that neither parent has the extra copy of chromosome 8, and the chances are low that the same change will happen in another pregnancy. If a parent carries a balanced chromosome translocation there may be an increased risk to have another child with mosaic trisomy 8. Speak with your doctor or a genetic counselor to discuss your personalized risk.

References
  • https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/gard/5359/mosaic-trisomy-8/resources/1
Can someone with mosaic trisomy 8 have a successful pregnancy?

Individuals with mosaic 8 may or may not be able to have children. Many people with mosaic trisomy 8 have miscarriages. However, there are people with mosaic trisomy 8 that have had successful pregnancies. These pregnancies may need high risk management. Speak with your doctor if you are thinking about having children or have reproductive questions.

References
  • http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?Lng=EN&Expert=96061
Why might people with mosaic trisomy 8 have multiple miscarriages?

People with mosaic trisomy 8 have an extra chromosome 8 in some cells of the body, but not all cells of the body. If a person with mosaic trisomy 8 passes on the extra chromosome, the child may have the extra chromosome 8 in every cell of the body, called full or complete trisomy 8. Babies with full trisomy 8 do not typically survive and will miscarry during a pregnancy.

References
  • http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?Lng=EN&Expert=96061
Will a child with mosaic trisomy 8 be able to go to school?

Children with mosaic trisomy 8 can attend school. If they are experiencing learning difficulties, they may benefit from special classes and an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) that help them reach their full potential. They many also benefit from additional therapies including physical, speech, and occupational therapy.

References
  • http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?Lng=EN&Expert=96061
Does agenesis of the corpus callosum cause any problems, such as learning disabilities in mosaic trisomy 8?

Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC), when the tissue that connects the left and right parts of the brain does not develop, can cause a range of symptoms. In the mildest cases, people with ACC may have trouble with visual patterns. In more severe forms, it can cause seizures, extra fluid in the brain (hydrocephalus), and muscle stiffness (hypertonia).

References
  • http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/agenesis/agenesis.htm#Is_there_any_treatment
What is the average IQ of people with mosaic trisomy 8?

The average IQ in individuals with mosaic trisomy 8 is 50-75. People in this range can go to school and can have jobs as adults. Sometimes, they may need extra assistance. However, the range of intellectual disabilities in people with mosaic trisomy 8 can vary widely from no intellectual disability to severe.

References
  • https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/gard/5359/mosaic-trisomy-8/resources/9
If I have a child with mosaic trisomy 8, what are the chances that my next child will have it?

If neither parent has mosaic trisomy 8, then the chances are low that another child will have the same disorder. Usually, mosaic trisomy 8 is caused by a chromosomal abnormality that happened for the first time in the child. This means that neither parent has the extra chromosome 8, and the chances are low that the same change will happen in another pregnancy. If the mosaic trisomy 8 is cause by a balanced chromosome translocation in a parent there is a higher risk that a family may have another child with mosaic trisomy 8.

Speak to a genetic counselor or a medical geneticist to learn more about your personalized risk.

References
  • http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?Lng=EN&Expert=96061

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