Clouston syndrome

Symptoms

What are the main symptoms of Clouston Syndrome?

Clouston syndrome is a genetic condition that can affect a person's hair, nails, and skin. It is a form of ectodermal dysplasia. Hair can be sparse, lighter in color, patchy, fragile, and/or absent. Fingernails and toenails can also be malformed, small, and/or thickened. Skin on the hands and feet can be thick, and skin over joints may be darker in color. Teeth and sweat glands are typically not affected. Not everyone with Clouston syndrome experience the same signs or symptoms.

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What hair differences can be seen in Clouston Syndrome?

What nail differences can be seen in Clouston Syndrome?

What skin differences can be seen in Clouston Syndrome?

What teeth differences can be seen in Clouston Syndrome?

What sweat differences can be seen in Clouston Syndrome?

Do people with Clouston Syndrome have developmental delay?

Is everyone with Clouston Syndrome affected the same?

What hair differences can be seen in Clouston Syndrome?

People with Clouston syndrome may have hair that is sparse, fine, brittle, light in color, patchy, or absent. Patchy or absent hair can also be called partial or total alopecia. The eyebrows, eyelashes, pubic, and armpit (axillary) hair may also be sparse or absent. Hair problems may get worse as a person with Clouston syndrome goes through puberty.

What nail differences can be seen in Clouston Syndrome?

People with Clouston syndrome may have differences in their nails. During the first year of life, the nails may appear white. Over the course of one's lifetime, the nails will grow slowly and may become malformed, thickened, or small. This is called nail dystroph and is considered the most noticeable feature of Clouston syndrome.

What skin differences can be seen in Clouston Syndrome?

There can be skin differences in people with Clouston syndrome. The skin on the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet can be thickened (palmoplantar hyperkeratosis) and typically gets worse as one gets older. The skin over the joints may be darker in color (hyperpigmentation). The fingertips may also be wider and rounder than expected (clubbing).

What teeth differences can be seen in Clouston Syndrome?

Although the teeth are often affected in other types of ectodermal dysplasia, the teeth are typically normal in individuals with Clouston syndrome.

What sweat differences can be seen in Clouston Syndrome?

In other forms of ectodermal dysplasia, people may have abnormalities with their sweat glands causing them to have problems sweating. However, people with Clouston syndrome do not typically have problems with their sweat glands or their ability to sweat.

Do people with Clouston Syndrome have developmental delay?

People with Clouston syndrome do not typically have developmental delay or require extra help in school.

Is everyone with Clouston Syndrome affected the same?

No. People with Clouston syndrome can be affected differently. It is difficult to predict which specific medical concerns an individual will experience. Some people will be more mildly affected and some people will be more severely affected. Even multiple people in the same family who have Clouston syndrome can be affected differently.

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