Bifid nose

Overview

What is bifid nose?

A bifid nose is a rare birth defect in which the nose is divided into two separate parts. The extent to which the nose is affected can be very different from one person to the next. In its mildest form, there is a small, minimally noticeable groove at the tip of the nose. In the most severe form, the bones and cartilage of the nose are completely divided, resulting in two half noses. Bifid nose is seen fairly often with widely spaced eyes and cleft lip/palate (an opening in the lip and or roof of the mouth). Sometimes a bifid nose is the only difference in development or birth defect in a person. Other times a bifid nose can be part of a condition that includes multiple differences in growth and function such as the fusion of both halves of the brain.

Bifid nose can appear for the first time in a person or be passed from one generation to the next based on the inheritance of one or more gene changes (mutations).

Patients with a bifid nose are encouraged to seek medical services through a specialized craniofacial clinic. Craniofacial clinics specialize in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up care of patients with a face and skull differences like a bifid nose. The following organizations provide a list of craniofacial clinics throughout the world on their websites:

SOURCE: Emory University - Department of Human Genetics in collaboration with ThinkGenetic • https://www.thinkgenetic.com/diseases/bifid-nose/overview/403 • DATE UPDATED: 2016-07-02

References

"Bifid Nose; Autosomal Recessive." Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. 2 Nov 2009. Web. 14 June 2016. http://www.omim.org/entry/210400

“Bifid nose.” Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center. 1 July 2011. Web. 14 June 2016. https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/gard/884/bifid-nose/resources/1

This content comes from a hidden element on this page.

The inline option preserves bound JavaScript events and changes, and it puts the content back where it came from when it is closed.

Remember Me